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Reductive monoprint - Mushrooms

 Another first go - this time with reductive monoprint (which means starting with lots of ink and wiping it away)




Here's the process

I've put a white cloth on the table and covered it with a large piece of acetate which I bought from a DIY store. (They can cut to size which is very useful!) You don't need to do this, it just makes life easier.

I've put a piece of paper under the acetate as a size guide when inking up.


For the first attempt I used Caligo printing ink and covered the area with a thin layer of ink rollered until you can hear the "crackle" (just a lovely whispering sound that tells you the paint is the right thickness)

Below - using a cloth to wipe shapes from the ink surface. This is done freehand with illustrations from a book to give me confidence; essentially mushrooms are just ovals with a thick stem.


Printing the image onto paper. Use your hands to gently rub the paper - or use a brayer, spoon, or barron to transfer the image from the plate. All those loose sheets of printer paper you can see are masks I've put round the sides of the plate to give me a nice edge .


The reveal  - areas for improvement as usual but a quick and easy way to print. Maybe slightly damp paper would have given more detail.



I also tried using Open Acrylics and although you have to be quite quick as the paint dries more quickly than the printing inks, I liked the effect more. Don't think you could use ordinary acrylics as it dries too quickly.












4 comments:

  1. Very cool! I've played with reductive printing, which is a challenge in itself. I like this process!!! Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Thanks Robbie! One day it's time consuming meticulous dry point and the next speedy mushrooms. Nice to have something for every state of mind!!

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  2. Wow! That is fascinating. My list of experiments has grown. Thank you so much for sharing your process.

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    1. Thank you Jeannie, you're most welcome - do give it a go!

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