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...."such a perfect day"......wriggle, wriggle.

Such a lovely day here in the Midlands, and rather than go out this afternoon for a walk and refreshments, we decided to stay in the garden and catch up on some work.  I love a gentle potter, but I haven't done anything on my own little plot for ages and ages....  I've been to parks, schools, roundabouts, forgotten bits behind bins, and on the corners of thoroughfares, but nothing in my own garden and it's a disgrace!  Shame on me. Go on Rainbow, into the corner with you and put that plant pot on your head and cast your eyes downwards, and be thoroughly ashamed. 

Mind you, this gardening lark can be quite alarming and I did have a bit of a shock - ghastly goings on in the compost.  Eeeeeyouuu.

I lifted the lid of the black bin in which DH stores the leftover raw veg and trimmings, expecting it to be empty.  No, no snakes or toads, but there were worms.  Not just say, a hundred, but a thick layer almost 2 inches deep of small red wriggly things.

Well, dear reader, I confess to a muffled scream. The lid was flung upwards in my haste to escape. Sadly, I failed to notice the thick lining of worms on said lid, which soon parted company from the plastic once the correct velocity was reached.  Unfortunately for me, most of them landed on my arm and head.   I confess, I ran. Pointless of course, as worms are not known for giving chase but there you go. I shook my head until my ears rang and tore off my clothes doing a passable impression of a Life quilt as I hastened to the shower and a slug of gin. Phew and yuck.

I've also put a coat of paint in the background of the portraits.  No worms here.


10 comments:

  1. They sound like tiger worms or whatever they are that people buy to put in wormeries! You could be selling the little darlings!!!

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    1. Yes ltw I think they were. Very good things to have in the compost, but not so good on a person. It was the shock of seeing them there - I wasn't expecting it. I quite like worms normally - I'm told I used to eat them when a lot younger!

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  2. Glad to hear that you recovered. My friend's brother used to make, and eat, worm sandwiches when he was younger.

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    1. Oh good grief. That's appallingly horrid!! How did he turn out?

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  3. Your entry gave me a good chuckle, love the acacia I can't grow them here.

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    1. I think it's fairly tender here, and we're standing by with insulating fleece in case the weather turns. Fortunately it's been quite a mild winter.

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  4. Giggles about the wriggles! Ian is in charge of the 5 compost bins ( labelled Goldilocks and the 3 bears - and Goldilocks love child!) and frequently brandishes the lid to show me the accumulation of worms round the rim. Sometimes they drop off in his enthusiasm so I do sympathise.

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    1. Like the bins!! I guess the love child just turned up a bit later?! How nice of Ian to share the joy-of-worms with you; very generous!

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  5. If it didn't make me cough I'd be laughing out loud at the scene you've painted (sorry for the pun and the laughing). I know a song about going down the garden to eat worms. A friend wrote and illustrated it for me many many moons ago when I was poorly. I wonder where it is now? I'm glad the gin helped. Your portrait paintings are phenomenal!

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  6. Thank you Julie x is that song the one that goes: nobody likes me, everybody hates me, I'm going down the garden to eat worms. Long thin slimed ones, short fat fuzzy ones, gooey gooey gooey gooey worms. The long thin slimed ones slip down easily, the short fat fuzzy ones stick. They stick in your teeth and the middles go slurp, slurp, slurp. Bite off their heads and suck out the juice, and throw the skins away. Nobody knows how I survive on a hundred worms a day. Xx

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